The Number 1 Most Effective Presentation Skill: Rise Above Your Competition and Get Rave Reviews

We’ve all been exposed to a terrible presenter or instructor. The minutes drag by while the presenter seems oblivious to the reactions and needs of the audience. As an educator I know that there are several elements that are essential in creating a successful presentation. One of the most important is pacing. You should strive for a pace that moves quickly enough to maintain interest but allows enough processing time for the audience to comprehend the information. Processing time is the secret that will set your presentation apart from most of your competition.

Let’s use a 50 minute presentation as an example. Unless you’ve been hired as a keynote speaker you never want to spend the entire 50 minutes talking non-stop. Your presentation needs to be broken up into segments. This helps your listeners retain much more information than they would otherwise.

All parts of your presentation are not equal in terms of audience attention and retention. There is a natural ebb and flow to how we listen. We tend to remember best what we hear first, second best what we hear at the end and remember least what comes just past the middle. This is not news. We’ve known this for over 100 years, but like with many things, just because we know the right thing to do that doesn’t mean that we do it!

Talking to a group for 50 minutes or longer is common practice in school and business settings. We know better, yet we continue to do it. There is a better way and one that makes you an in-demand, effective presenter.

When you start preparing your presentation think in terms of dividing it into 3 segments. In a 50 minute presentation there will be two segments of optimal learning and a time when learning is lowest. These are referred to as Prime Time 1, Prime Time 2 and Down-Time.

The first segment is Prime Time 1 when retention is highest. Present new, important information here when your audience is fresh and most receptive. Don’t waste a lot of time talking about the weather, telling jokes or warming up the audience. You do need to create rapport but you can do this within the context of your material. Seminar presenter Fred Gleeck, says he always gives his most important piece of information in the first few minutes of a seminar. After about 12 minutes, retention starts diminishing. At 20 minutes it’s time for something else.

We now move into the second phase: Down-Time. The brain gets full of the new information and the mind starts to wander. Now is the time to have participants put their new knowledge to use. Set up a quick activity that allows participants to process the material in some way- talking to a partner or a small group or journaling. This gives the audience a break from new material, a chance to talk with others and hopefully move around a bit. It also lets your previous information “sink in” so it will be remembered. This activity will last roughly 8-10 minutes.

Now you are ready for Prime Time 2. This is the second best time for learning and retaining material. Use the last several minutes for review and closure.

If you follow this method your audiences will remain interested, retain more information and rave about your effective presentation skills. If you don’t give your audience time to process you will waste their time and your time.

5 Ways to Present Curated Content to Your Readers

There are two steps in the procedure of content curation. The first is to find outstanding content that your readers will love. You can do that through feeds, alerts and other tools. The second step is to present the content. There are numerous and different places where you can share content with your readers.

1. Your Blog

Curating content on your blog can expand the range of your followers, it can also add SEO power, and helps you keep posting fresh content when you’re low on ideas. When you’ve been writing and posting articles to your blog for a while, it’s easy to run out of fresh and new ideas. Curating content for your blog helps you create original posts that your followers are interested in. The one great advantage is that you don’t have to be an expert on any niche related topic to find articles related to that topic and comment on them.

2. Facebook Fan Pages

Facebook Fan Pages offer an even more “social” place to share your curated content. Create Fan Pages that highlight sub-topics within your niche. You can even create separate pages for each specific topic. Find content to share via Facebook and post it directly to your page, or share content from other sources. Articles, blogs, videos, and images all work well.

Make sure that you use your pages as a means of engaging with your audience and not just publishing. Don’t run them on autopilot. When there are comments, questions or other activity on the page, respond and engage with your audience.

3. Infographics

Infographics are really nothing more than curated content presented in a graphic form. You take content from various sources and create a graphic that presents this content to your readers so that they can take it in at a glance. Infographics are especially good for taking complex ideas and breaking them down into a more easily digestible form.

Online tools and templates are available that help you make creating Infographics easier. Once you create the overall design, it’s only a matter of plugging in the content and then tweaking to make it more visually appealing.

Also, a great thing with infographics is that you can give them away to your followers and allow them to re-use them or even add their own name to them.

4. Email Newsletters

Curated content offers a great way to keep your email subscribers informed and entertained. It takes much more than promotional offers to keep them tuned in. When you send your subscribers a steady stream of fresh content that answers a problem they may have, updates them on a new procedure or is just interesting to them, you stay on their radar and by doing this can establish your reputation as a valuable information source or the go to guy for their own problems.

One of the best ways to choose the right topics for your emails is to come right out and ask your list what kind of content they’d like to receive from you. Your subscribers will also give you feedback in the form of analytics. Watch open rates to find out which content is most interesting to them.

5. Social Curating Sites

Sites like List.ly and Pinterest are social media networks designed for curating content. These are wonderful because they allow you to find and publish content in one place, as well as interact with other users. Look for sites that are loaded with features that help you customize your content curation.

No matter where you publish, always remember to add something of your own to the curated content. Just sharing a link on Twitter isn’t content curation; neither is copying and pasting sections of someone else’s article to your blog, even if you give them attribution. Try using your curated content as the basis for explaining your opinions, giving insights on a new topic, or exploring the opinions of others.

Negotiating Debt Settlements – How to Use the Threat of Bankruptcy to Eliminate Unsecured Debt

Any kind of negotiation needs appealing skills. To negotiate debt settlements with the creditors one has to be up to date with his arrears, interest and principal amount. So, gather all the information for liability payment from the card organisation, chart out the stats and have the information on the tips of your finger to appeal to the creditors and negotiate debt settlements.

Write down the negotiation in the form of a letter, though conversations are always better. Talk to the creditors on phone and be appealing leaving a good first impression. Do not rely on verbal agreement, they are insecure and cannot be counted upon. Have the agreements on paper with clear drawn out ideas. Do not show the eagerness to negotiate debt settlement early in stage.

Keep a track of all the investments, expenses done. Cut down on the habitual spending; assess the rate of interest and any fees that have to be paid on the regular agenda to negotiate debt settlements. Maintain equilibrium between the amount of money at hand and the arrear amount to be paid.

Pay the liabilities intelligently, have priorities, pay off the arrears with higher rate of interest giving them more attention than the amount with lower rate as they might stack up to a huge amount in the future. Use the money at hand wisely keeping future in mind. Few of the debit negotiating companies place trust on the borrowers by collecting a minimal amount of fee monthly on a condition that the borrower will pay the arrear amount in full on a future date mentioned in the agreement.

Hire a professional negotiator if affordable and put forth a proposal of repayment of liability in front of the creditors clearly charted out. Initially, one would face rejection but then the most appealing ones are always opted for. Ask for any schemes available in the organisation to negotiate debt settlements, include the same (if any) in the charted out plan. Show the creditors if opting for any loans, take help from different funding organisations or any financial sources and make sure borrowing from them is not adding up to more arrears.

Finally keep the words said, commit to the negotiation done. Check for the genuineness of the lending organisation, if they are following to the agreed requisites. Follow the agreed terms, keep up with them for future financial security.